Season 11

Season 11

MASTERS OF DISGUISE

A SHOW CURATED BY M-L-XL IN COLLABORATION WITH MAY CONCEPTS
14 SEPTEMBER – 15 OCTOBER 2019

Part of the Brompton Design District
35–36 Thurloe Place, London
(MAP)
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SEE••DS is pleased to present Masters of Disguise as part of Brompton Design District 2019, an exhibition that seeks to interpret this year’s theme Nature/Nurture by looking at the notion of human nature. In the current age of the Anthropocene, designers need to reflect not only on their work, but also at their own identity as creative professionals. Who we are and how we choose to represent ourselves to the world is deeply rooted in how we interpret the relationship to the environment. This is the essence of human nature.

Masters of Disguise will explore this concept by exhibiting the work of key contemporary artists/designers together with their interpretation of their individual identity - their ‘human nature’ - in the form of a mask. Questions of identity, performance and display are at the core of this exhibition. In the current era of hyper-visibility and obsession with image culture, a mask is a powerful metaphor for the changes of identity that we perform in our everyday interactions across different media and realities.

During the exhibition, a performative dinner will be hosted at the space where artists will be playing with their masks in a social gathering where the expression of hiding/revealing an identity will be presented to the hosts. The exhibition setting will be specifically created for the occasion using low-impact materials. Artists/designers will also be contributing to the exhibition with a number of objects that will be used during the performative opening event (including furniture, lights, tableware, cutlery, glasses, vases etc).

Curated by M–L–XL

M–L–XL is a design studio that works across different disciplines, including furniture design, installations, type design and publishing. The studio, with offices in Venice and London, was founded by Marco Campardo and Lorenzo Mason, and focuses on research, experimenting with languages, techniques and materials.

Season 11

Masters of Disguise

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We are pleased to present work by Tiago Almeida, Attua Aparicio, Nathalie Du Pasquier, Max Frommeld, Martino Gamper, Jochen Holz, Rio Kobayashi, Sabine Marcelis, Studio Furthermore, Michael Marriott, Lucia Massari, M–L–XL, Fredrik Paulsen, Bertjan Pot, James Shaw, Kim Thome, Soft Baroque, Lorenzo Vitturi and Bethan Laura Wood.

Selected Works PDF (here)
Press Release Download (here)
London Design Festival Website (here)

1/49

TIAGO ALMEIDA

TELL ME MORE

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Tiago likes the idea of a mask as a box where endless stories have been stored even from before its own existence. Each of these stories are pulled out by the ones who connect with it and can be told or perceived in individual or collective ways. This is how he imagines his mask: a box, a container of histories, fantasies, dreams and emotions on hold until someone will let them out. As its creator he can rule the way it looks but not the way it will be perceived.

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ATTUA APARACIO

KAOLIN & GLASS FACE MASK

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The porcelain 3D printed grid serves as a sieve for the glass to melt through the holes forming unexpected clusters of solidified glass drops. The eyes and the smile are made of solid glass, clear, teal and glow in the dark, which works as a distorting lens for the grid.

3/49

ATTUA APARICIO

ROUGH VASES

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Attua Aparicio has been working with borosilicate glass, which is non-recyclable in the UK. She explores ways to reuse this industrial waste into raw material. Through her recent residency in China, she has experimented with using this waste borosilicate glass as a glaze on ceramics, achieving many different surfaces and finishes.

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ATTUA APARICIO

SMOOTH VASES

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Attua Aparicio has been working with borosilicate glass, which is non-recyclable in the UK. She explores ways to reuse this industrial waste into raw material. Through her recent residency in China, she has experimented with using this waste borosilicate glass as a glaze on ceramics, achieving many different surfaces and finishes.

5/49

MAX FROMMELD

EXTENSION OF SELF

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This mask is a personification of mundane construction materials collected from the construction site of his family’s new home. In fact, it is composed of his future ceiling and skirting. Home influences identity.

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MARTINO GAMPER

DOUBLEFACE

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Psychological, psychedelic, and at times just plain psychotic.

8/49

JOCHEN HOLZ

MEINE MASKE

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The mask is assembled from recycled glass parts, like wine glass stems and feet. Jochen has a very material based practice focusing only on glassblowing so it made sense to also make the mask from glass. Partly because this is “his” material, but also because the question he posed: “do I also hide behind my material, skills and technique? “

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RIO KOBAYASHI

KAIJYU MASK

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We are soaking up so many things during our childhoods and lives. The mixture of influences and experiences makes us unique and contributes to our personality. Rio always tris to be himself and the mask he wears is a reflection of who he feels he is. Rio wanted the mask to reflect his Japanese heritage as well as his European side, and also, he received so many impressions in his life that flow into his memory, his body and his personality and they are in there as well…

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SABINE MARCELIS

FACE LENS

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A lens to distort the observer and what is observed.

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MICHAEL MARRIOTT

MMMASK

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Mmmask is made from an empty 5 litre container (Michael thinks it had glue in it). The combination of the handle and pourer, suggested a face, and was the right kind of size. Cutting two eye holes was all it needed to make it into a mask, but it still felt like the industrial packaging it was originally intended as. The addition of the blue nylon rope hair and orange tape transform it further and are suggestive of African masks.

12/49

LUCIA MASSARI

TESTA

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Testa, is an hand mirror that plays the role of a mask, this is part of a series of arcimboldo-esque mirrors composed of swirls rosettes, flowers and leaves, some of the most typical elements of craftwork on Venetian mirrors, in the place of beards, eyes, noses, and hair. the mask and the mirror are both typical Venetian artistic products: combining the two creates a new mask which maintains the decorative details of the antique venetian mirrors while downplaying any seriousness with irony and levity. It reflects the contemporary extensive use and misuse of our own image. And how much we are deeply connected and intertwined with the image we project on others.

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LUCIA MASSARI

TESTE COMPOSTE (GENTLEMAN)

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The gentleman is part of a series of arcimboldo-esque mirrors composed of swirls rosettes, flowers and leaves, some of the most typical elements of craftwork on Venetian mirrors, in the place of beards, eyes, noses, and hair. The mask and the mirror are both typical Venetian artistic products: combining the two creates a new mirror which maintains the decorative details of the antique venetian mirrors while downplaying any seriousness with irony and levity.

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M-L-XL

CRAYONS MASK

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Crayons Mask is an object of disguise - designed both to conceal a person’s identity as well as to mimic industrial modes of production through lo-fi technology. For this mask, a classic industrial process known as rotational moulding was recreated by using cheap, inexpensive materials and manual labour. Instead of a costly metal mould, the latter is made from paper into which were poured melted crayons - objects associated with experimentation and play. After the crayons solidify, they reveal vibrant textures and patterns. In turn, the paper-mould is destroyed, creating a unique outcome. An unorthodox, ersatz material that stands in for plastics coupled with hand-made production technique that conceals its industrial origin, makes this an object of ambiguity and disguise.

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FREDRIK PAULSEN

FRIED MASK

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Fredrik´s private and (much beloved) crepe pan. Re-purposed to function as a mask by cutting out eyes and mouth-like holes in it. By pouring in hot glass the pan was also used as a tool, making a set of crepe-smileys for the gallery dinner.

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BERTJAN POT

MASK

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Although seemingly masks tell stories, Bertjan’s started out as a material experiment. He wanted to find out if by stitching a rope together I could make a large flat carpet. Instead of flat the samples got curvy, not good for making carpets but perfect for shaping masks. After making Masks he also put Gloves to the repertoire. This is the first time a Mask and a Glove are united in one piece.

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JERSZY SEYMOUR

MASK

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Made from the residual mixing sticks coming from the series of works by Jerszy Seymour that discussed the possibility of a post capitalistic and libidinal economy based ‘Amateur’ society that used polycapralactone wax as both a physical connection and metaphors for bringing together things people and ideas, the Masks were originally presented at the MQ in Vienna as ‘Masks and Frames’ with the Masks representing the inner most freedom of the individual and the Frames representing a libidinal social construction.

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JAMES SHAW

OLD MAN OF THE SEA (AND THE LAND)

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This is the first presentation of a new plant based biocomposite just developed for this show. The material is made using entirely plant-based ingredients. This iteration also experiments into finishing materials. Combining traditional oil painting techniques and materials with modern processes.

20/49

SOFT BAROQUE

PILLOW MASTER

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Do you ever want to bury your face in the pillow for the entire day?

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IAIN HOWLETT OF STUDIO FURTHERMORE

WARRIOR KIPPER MASK

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Kipper sliced foam stretched over aluminium brow frame.

22/49

MARINA DRAGOMIROVA OF STUDIO FURTHERMORE

DANCER MASK

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Handmade neoprene crocheted face mask.

23/49

KIM THOMÉ

ONE LINER

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This mask is made from 1.8 metres of continuous brass wire. The “line” traces and highlights the features of the face as a suspended hand drawn sketch.

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LORENZO VITTURI

COTISSO SINCARA

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The mask is the result of a process of collection, transformations and assemblage of materials, which started in Peru and ended in Murano/Venice. The anatomical abstraction of the piece was obtained by mixing textiles and naturally dyied sheep yarns from Peru. These were then combined with Cotisso pieces - a glass material which both a raw material and a waste in Murano glass factories - and Murano glass pearls. The Cotisso was tempered and then tumbled using an ancient system that was used to produce Venetian pearls. Beyond the idea of mixing iconic materials from my two places of origin, namely glass and textiles, I also wanted to create a surreal mask that could embody an hybrid form in transformation.

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BETHAN LAURA WOOD + PIERS ATKINSON

MAKE ME UP

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Exploring the language of the veil, often warn by women.

26/49

M-L-XL

GEORGE TABLE

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George is an imposing table made from reclaimed sheets of Alpi wood. In creating the table, M-L-XL have decided to use discarded pieces of Alpi material. The sheets of wood – made from different colours and finishes – have been glued together to form a thick block of wood. In this way, what is usually used on the surface, becomes a structural element, inverting the relationship between form and function, decoration and construction. Treating this processed material as a block of timber, M-L-XL have chiselled the edges of the table, as a tongue-in-cheek homage to the great master George Nakashima. Inverting the relationship between the natural and the artificial, waste and resource, this project subtly questions the way we value materiality and material things.

27/49

M-L-XL

ELLE STOOL

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“Elle” is a idiosyncratic furniture collection developed as a result of extensive research on the use of metal L-profiles. The starting point of the research was the willingness to use a common, everyday material to question the meaning of “experimentation” that is often emphasised in today’s design practice. Through di erent combinations, this standardised extrusion is turned into a structural element, forming “invisible”, yet aesthetically revealing, joints. Rather than being made of aluminium, however, the furniture is made of brass — transforming an ordinary, mass-produced element into a sophisticated, bespoke item. The furniture was coated in holographic paint to further emphasise the interplay between standardised production and craftsmanship — where the objects themselves shift between concrete presence and immateriality.

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M-L-XL

ELLE CHAIR

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“Elle” is a idiosyncratic furniture collection developed as a result of extensive research on the use of metal L-profiles. The starting point of the research was the willingness to use a common, everyday material to question the meaning of “experimentation” that is often emphasised in today’s design practice. Through di erent combinations, this standardised extrusion is turned into a structural element, forming “invisible”, yet aesthetically revealing, joints. Rather than being made of aluminium, however, the furniture is made of brass — transforming an ordinary, mass-produced element into a sophisticated, bespoke item. The furniture was coated in holographic paint to further emphasise the interplay between standardised production and craftsmanship — where the objects themselves shift between concrete presence and immateriality.

29/49

ATTUA APARICIO

SUSPENDED STICK

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The handmade stoneware stick has been embedded with waste borosilicate glass chips, part of Attua’s ongoing research in ways of using waste borosilicate glass in combination with ceramics, as this glass can’t not be recycle with the conventional recycling systems. The ceramic stick is used as the support existing electrical and lighting components to create a suspended light. Craft and climbing hybridise with a hint of pop.

30/49

ATTUA APARICIO

JINGDEZHEN PLATES

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Made in Jingdezhen as part ofAttua’s ongoing research in ways of using waste borosilicate glass in combination with ceramics, as this glass can’t not be recycle with the conventional recycling systems.

31/49

JAMES SHAW

SWIVEL PARTY CHAIR

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Originally from a series of 20 chairs made in four days riffing on office furniture the chairs are all made with swivel bases and the same palette of materials we find in the corporate world of foam, aluminium, rubber, faux leather and paint. Referencing greats such as Gunnar Anderson and Linda Bengalis who worked at the start of the synthetic age now 50 years on these materials are all pervasive.

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JAMES SHAW

CRAZY MARM TABLE

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Traditional Linoleum is a surprising material, made from ingredients such as linseed oil, wood flour and hessian.

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JAMES SHAW

PLASTIC BAROQUE CUTLERY

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Hand formed 304 stainless steel flatware with hand extruded handles.

34/49

BETHAN LAURA WOOD

PINEAPPLE, BANANA, CUCUMBER

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Inspired by still life scenes and portraits in the Rijksmuseum, Bethan has created as part of the Room On The Roof residency at the Bijenkorf, hypnotic sickly sweet installation of fruit and desserts. Woven tea towels are stretched and glittered, transforming the dull duty of an after party clean-up into a late night disco room. All works are produced in collaboration with TextielMuseum, Tilburg.

35/49

KIM THOMÉ

MARGATE MAN

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Do your surroundings influence your practise and do they inspire new work? Having recently moved to Margate after 13 years in London, Kim wanted to explore this further. Margate Man is the result of exploring chalk rocks as a material and gently forming them into mask of men that may have once landed on the beaches here.

36/49

JOCHEN HOLZ

BARK GLASSES

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With his bark glasses, Jochen explores the rarely practiced glass blowing technique of lamp working. The work focuses on the materiality of borosilicate glass and a unique process to produce rich textures and complex shapes. Glass is often seen as a material of ultimate perfection, qualities of high polished transparency and vibrant colours. Jochen aims to disrupt this perfection and to break down the pristine nature of glass.

37/49

JOCHEN HOLZ

COLOURED GLASS BOWL

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Hand-blown coloured and textured glass.

38/49

JOCHEN HOLZ

CANDLESTICK

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Jochen has hand-blown long tubes of coloured, transparent, plain and textutred glass and then bended and cut them in various configuations, creating unique candleholders.

39/49

RIO KOBAYASHI

MIKODOSAN CHAIR

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Easy chair Mikadokun and table/stool Mikadochan are made of turned ash poles with pointed ends. The joints are precise, delicate and at the same time sturdy. Each piece is uniquely hand-painted in red, blue and yellow colours.

42/49

RIO KOBAYASHI

ROBOT SHELF

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Rio Kobayashi combines in his sculptural shelf design the robotic and the human, the male and the female, the dead and the living and home storage and artful crafts. Rio Kobayashi’s core idea is that a shelf shows a lot about the personality of the owner. This thought inspired the Londonbased maker/designer to create a shelf that has its own persona. There are all features of a human body from head to toes and sometimes we can see a robotic expression and sometimes we see a stylised human character in a combination of line drawing and volumetric shapes. The expression changes with the angle from which the shelf is viewed.

43/49

SOFT BAROQUE WITH DAVID HORAN

STANDARD STEEL BENCH

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The Standard Sheet Bench is a monolithic steel form created from a combination of a few simple actions. Working with a bespoke metal fabrication company, a flat sheet of steel is manipulated in three operations: it is rolled into a tube, pressed flat and the ends are bent at two points to form the verticals. The resulting contours and curves are a result of this rather violent process.

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SOFT BAROQUE

CARVED ALUMINIUM ARMCHAIR

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Using a standard 40 x 80 mm aluminium box section we constructed a simple armchair. The aluminium members, reminiscent of 2 x 4 timber, has sections graphically cut away revealing the hollow structure. It is a technical replica of a rustic primitive construction.

45/49

SOFT BAROQUE

CARVED ALUMINIUM VASE

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The aluminium extrusion, reminiscent of timber, has sections graphically cut away revealing the hollow structure. It is a technical replica of a rustic primitive construction.

46/49

STUDIO FURTHERMORE

MOON ROCK STOOL

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Studio Furthermore offers us a glimpse into a not-too-distant future which sees lunar mining provide much of the scarce feed material with which industry depends, taking the strain off of Earth’s diminished resources. The designers imagine working with Moon rock as marble or granite would be worked today. Taking cues from lunar geology, the studio have created a monolithic material language fusing recognisable geometric shapes with chiseled rock formations. Moon Rock by Studio Furthermore consists of lunar cut mineral ore furniture and light sculptures as well as collectible rocks. Each one unique in the universe.

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STUDIO FURTHERMORE

REPLICA LIGHT

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When produced faithfully, a replica or forgery is near indistinguishable from an original work. We are all familiar with tales of elusive art forgers working from the shadows to create paintings or sculptures so true as to leave the most discerning of experts non the wiser. From the designers perspective however, the act of replication provides a more noble avenue of possibilities. Engaging in various methods of replication, Studio Furthermore have turned the notion of replica on its head.

The studio have developed original replication methods that they refer to as ‘lost foam’ processes working with both ceramic and aluminium alloy materials. Designs are carefully handcrafted out of an ubiquitous foam material; each of these items constitutes an ‘original’. During the lost foam ceramic process, a foam original burns away inside a kiln leaving behind a one of a kind terracotta foam REPLICA. For the lost foam alloy process, a foam original is entombed in sand. Molten alloy is poured onto the foam original which in turn vaporizes leaving behind a metallic REPLICA. In each case an original work is sacrificed and what remains is a REPLICA.

Developing this body of work, Studio Furthermore searched for inspiration in the rocks, clays and mineral ores which resembled some of their material experiments in terracotta and aluminium. A parallel could be drawn between the material characteristics of rock formations and various studio samples. Seeking cues from nature, Studio Furthermore headed far north to the shores of Iceland, a place laded with geological processes observable in constantly shifting landscapes. Foamy lava rocks and cooled magma debris decorate an alien landscape of volcanoes, geysers and icebergs. Tephra hued soils rich in minerals lay bare the otherwise obscured processes that create them. This young land, still in its primordial phase, perpetually forms and reforms via it’s rock cycles. Energy and matter releasing from within the earth cool in varying conditions to produce a wide spectrum of rock materials. Silent and inanimate, rocks are themselves a curiosity as they express little but that of the processes to which they owe their formation. original work is sacrificed and what remains is a REPLICA.

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STUDIO FURTHERMORE

FUCHILLA CHAIR

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Fuchila is a weaved chair inspired by Bulgarian carpet making traditions that developed into a research of the fundamentals of weaving. A metal frame begins as a loom but a tapestry is woven over it and remains in place to become a seat. Strong nylon threads are used for the warp and weft so that the weaved textile can be stretched into its position from two to three dimensional. The areas where you sit and where you rest your back are weaved and the rest is left unwoven to give the chair lightness and transparency. The intrinsic character of a loom in use is expressed through the seat strings. Marina learn from the craft weavers of her native country Bulgaria and expanded her knowledge during residences in Copenhagen and Cyprus. A unique collaboration with the Ikat weaver Ptolemy Mann resulted in a one of a kind Ikat variation and there is a two seater variation as well.

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